The Christians

I love exploring the history of the Shaws and the Pinkertons – my grandmother Nolie’s people – and I know that there are many more stories to tell. I very much want to dig deeper into my Scottish past – I feel like those Scottish calico dyers have a lot more to tell me!

And I continue to be fascinated by Margaret Pinkerton – did she really emigrate alone, leaving that seemingly functional and happy family behind? Why? There were many reasons to leave Scotland for Canada at that point – poverty, employment, education — but why did she leave her entire extended family who seemed to have resources, employment and connections?  I continue to search immigration records, but so far, I don’t even have a hint.

But now I want to take a look at my grandfather’s people – the Christians and the Gees. J. Ronald’s mother, Susan Christian Gee, if not the most interesting twig on the tree, was certainly the most surprising to me! But before we learn about Susan, let’s start with her parents.

Some time prior to the Civil War, there was a slave owning family by the name of Sauer residing in Mason County, Kentucky. They were of German descent, and this name is still fairly common on both sides of the Ohio River in southern Ohio and northern Kentucky.

In 1845, one of the Sauer family slaves caught wind of the fact that the Sauer family was going to sell off some “human property.” This woman’s name was Susan, and she was my third great grandmother. Fearing that her young family would be split up, Susan and her husband Charles, prepared to run away with their children. Dressed in extra layers of clothing, they took off on their way to freedom. (Enslaved people often ran away in the winter as their owners were less attuned to their slaves’ whereabouts during non-planting and non-harvesting seasons. Furthermore, it was more difficult for the dogs to trace their scent in the winter months.) On the run through the Underground Railroad with his parents was my great great grandfather, Henry Christian, about ten years old.

I like to think that I was always aware of, and certainly interested in, the Underground Railroad, perhaps because I have so often lived in its shadow, such as Pittsford Village and the Michigan Avenue African American Corridor in Buffalo which I travel every day. But it’s another thing entirely to acknowledge that my very own flesh and blood – my very own great great grandfather – actually made this treacherous journey.  I am in awe of the courage that this young family.

 

 

One thought on “The Christians

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s